Changing Lanes

  Our lives are made up from a range of experiences and it is these experiences that give us our belief system. For instance and keeping it simple, as a child if you burned yourself on the stove, you learnt very quickly to keep away from it if you did not want to feel pain. In my NLP training courses, I teach my students that it is human nature to move towards pleasure and away from pain. So this experience was an easy one to learn as it follows the natural habit of human nature. 
During our lifetime, we will be party to many learning experiences which will shape as a person and form our own belief system and these experiences give us the reasoning behind why we act in a certain way. Over time the way in which we behave is built in to us subconsciously in that eventually we do not really think about acting before we do it. Think about people eating popcorn at the cinema and reaching the bottom of the box and finding it all gone and asking ourselves how did that happen so quickly?? So as we are all driven towards pleasure, the subconscious behaviour is not always a positive one i.e. over-eating, binge drinking, gambling etc.

For example, some smokers tend to lack confidence in themselves. The act of smoking puts them at ease and gives them back their self-esteem in social situations. The smoker would need to understand why they lack confidence. Did they have a controlling parents? or is smoking their subconscious act of rebellion against their parents?

It is when an experience creates un-helpful or negative behaviour that we then find ourselves in a downward spiral which culminates in low self esteem and low mood and eventually pain that we try to move ourselves from but the vicious circle of negative self-talk and thinking prevents change from happening.

Once we really understand why we act in a certain way and what our triggers are, we can consciously change this until it becomes subconcious behaviour. It just takes a little conscious work on our part for a period of time until the message becomes part of our make-up. Some people can do this on their own and others seek alternative therapies such as hypnotherapy.

By using hypnotherapy as a tool this can also help us to effectively re-program the thinking behind the behaviour and change it to a more positive behaviour or thought. The technique of hypnotherapy is the art of taking a client into a deep relaxed state to the point where the therapist can access the client’s subconscious mind and talk to it to remove the unwanted behaviour and replace it with something else.

It’s like changing lanes when driving, if the direction in which you are going is not going to reach your destination you need to mirror, signal, maneovre in order to change lanes. Once you understand the reason behind your behaviour and recognise the triggers you can take back control and change that behaviour to reach your goal.

Our new NLP Practitioner courses teach this technique as well as a range of other useful tools that can help people to make long and lasting changes to their lives. If you wish to learn more about a career in Life Coaching, NLP or Hypnotherapy call us today on 01462 431112 or visit our website at www.lifepractice.co.uk

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How well is your workforce?

  
Right now 1 in 6 workers in the UK is dealing with anxiety, depression or stress.Mental health problems alone among workers cost the UK economy over £26 billion every year. This does not include physical health problems which adds considerably to the cost and sickness days away from work.

We spend the majority of our time working so it is vital that the place in which we work is a happy and supportive one and where we feel valued. Whether you are a part of a team, Line Manager or Senior Partner the support that you offer your staff is key to performance. The culture of the workplace in recent years has begun to change as companies are recognising that mental and physical health does impact on their bottom line. If you look after staff wellbeing then staff morale and loyalty, innovation, productivity and profits will rise.

Research studies show that companies that are rated “the top 10 Best places to work” are more profitable than those that are not. This is down to the supportive environment within their organisations and how the company make their employees feel valued and supported by providing resources such as Resilience Training, Wellbeing workshops and teaching them effective communication skills.

Findings from 56 studies on work site wellness programs that were published in the American Journal of Health Promotion showed an average 27 percent reduction in sick leave absenteeism, 26 percent reduction in health care costs, and 32 percent reduction in workers’ compensation and disability management cost claims.

So where does a company start with wellness?

You need to start at the top and work down. A supportive corporate culture includes not only a commitment to the wellness program from senior management, but also extends to the mid-level and front line managers best positioned to affect program success due to their day-to-day contact with employees. It is, thus, important to align their management and performance goals with the health and wellbeing of the people who report to them.

It is also important for Managers to recognise the environmental context which includes influences external to the workplace, such as the home setting, friends and social networks, and the policies and resources of the local and national community. Although workers spend a significant amount of their time in the employment setting, these other factors can also affect their need for and success in a wellness program.

So how does a company motivate their staff to change?

Once again when influencing and promoting change in a work place it needs to start from the top down so firstly, Senior Executives could implement initiatives or form a working party within their organisation to investigate what their employees would like to see or what challenges they face.

Whilst keeping within HR regulations, a Health related questionnaire could be developed for all employees to complete which would give the company insight into their variety of needs and therefore support to be offered. Here are some other examples for introducing wellness into an organisation:

  • By delegating and giving more autonomy to staff, chosen staff members could set up a health and wellness in the workplace committee and have them take responsibility for implementing the selected ideas for health promotion activities
  • Designate a wellness coordinator for implementing action plans
  • Allocate a budget for health and wellness in the workplace activities
  • Develop good employment practice and policies, eg, communication systems; training and personal development; supervision, appraisal and mentoring; attendance / absence management; equal opportunities; return to work/rehabilitation for people with illnesses or disabilities; time off for career responsibilities (children, other dependents); job sharing; flexi-time and flexible hours / days; dealing with harassment and bullying; grievance procedure; disciplinary procedure
  • Include health and wellness in the workplace activities in manager’s objectives

It is a good idea but these things cost money.There are many ways in which companies have incorporated Wellness into their organisations which come with relatively little cost. Here are a few ideas:

  • Cross-department teams could earn points over a 12-week period by doing healthy things like drinking a certain amount of water or going for a walk on their lunch breaks
  •  Subsidising healthy options in vending machines with junk food options. For instance, charge more for a cupcake and less for an apple.
  • Set up a walking club before or after work.
  • Conduct meetings whilst walking.
  • Start a pedometer challenge with a goal of 10,000 steps a day.
  • Provide a safe place to store bikes in the office.
  • Encourage employees to take the stairs.
  • Buy healthy food for meetings instead of junk food.
  • Health and wellness seminars / discussions – with guest speakers
  • Awareness raising, workshops, training sessions on health topics
  • Offer lactation rooms for working mothers

Once you have management fully on board, it’s time to market the program to employees. Posters, emails and newsletters can spread the word. Even inject a little fun into the project and utilise photos of executives displaying bad posture or holding up an apple to advertise wellness events. Prize incentives can also be offered when running a challenge.

At the Life Practice we offer Wellness at Work programs to help companies promote health and wellbeing within their organisation. We offer a range a programs to suit all budgets. Call us today for more information Tel:  01462 431112 or Visit our website

Mental illness affects 1 in 4 people, how can employers support

ladybusAccording the latest report by the government’s Chief Medical Office, Professor Dame Sally Davies, 1 in 4 people will suffer a Mental illness in their lifetime. Around 70 million working days are lost because of stress, anxiety and other mental health conditions each year, a rise of a quarter since 2009. Last year this amounted to a cost of up to £100 billion to the economy.

In her report, Dame Sally called on the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, the NHS watchdog, to weigh up the costs of allowing workers with depression or anxiety to be fast-tracked for treatment, however, this costs money which we know the NHS simply do not have.

Yes, NHS spending needs to increase from the current 13% of the budget that it spends on Mental Health care but employers can help prevent many work related stress disorders from overcoming their employees by ensuring that they have relevant systems in place first, and this may prevent conditions such as anxiety rearing themselves to the surface in the first place.

Of those employees receiving medical care from the NHS they say that it is good but is not the reason they work well. The reason they work well is because of their employer who supports them.

consultationAt Life Practice group of clinics we see many individuals sent to us by their employers looking for help with Mental illnesses such anxiety, depression, panic attacks, social anxiety and executive burn-out otherwise known as “adrenal fatigue”. When assessing these individuals we find that many of them have been on a slow spiral downwards for several months before they have sought help. The reasons behind their ill health vary from difficult relationships at work, feeling undervalued as an employee, lack of support, lack of self-esteem and confidence, lack of fulfilment, the list goes on. With others their illness has stemmed from an external source within their family such as bereavement, divorce or an ill family member requiring care.
We believe that employers could do far more to support their employees by offering Mental Health Awareness days and regular confidential Mental Health assessments via qualified external sources in order to combat this alarming rising figure.
They could also have in place a protocol for any of their employees struggling with their Mental Health by offering flexible working hours, or part-time working post-illness which could be a key way to prevent sufferers from having to take too much time off work.

Quite often anxiety and depression leaves sufferers feeling helpless, out of control and without any direction of how to get better. By offering a confidential service whereby our clients can talk openly about all areas of their lives, personal and working, we can then ascertain what areas are causing the imbalance and set about agreeing a goal and action plan. This may include helping them to approach their employer about their issues and worries and making suggestions of perhaps re-structuring their week in order to cope with the job at hand, identifying any areas of training that may be required and teaching them to communicate effectively with their team.

Jubilant BusinesswomanWith a plan of action, this offers the individual a feeling of control over the situation which immediately creates optimism for the future ahead. Professor Dame Sally, says that employers can make a significant difference to the health of their staff. “They can make it by actually talking about it, knowing how their people are, whether they have ill health, supporting them by giving them flexible working if they need it, by reducing stigma.”

With figures from the report stating that an estimated 60 to 70 per cent of people with common mental health disorders were in full time work suggests that no company in England is without this problem within their work force. Employers have a duty of care to their employees and must treat their mental health the same as their physical health.

The Life Practice runs clinics and Mental Health Awareness Days & Stress Management Workshops across the country: Brighton, Cambridge, Harley Street, Hitchin, St. Albans & Liverpool. Call our Head Office today to find out more information Tel: 01462 431112

 

How Social is your Business?

communicationHow Social is your Business?

It is difficult to ignore the term “Social Media” now as it has grown substantially in recent years and with most individuals possessing a Facebook account for entertainment and keeping in touch with friends and family it has equally become a very useful marketing tool for businesses.

Facts & Figures

Did you know that:

25% of online consumer time is spent on Social Media sites

Facebook is the most used Social Media site with the average user age 18-25 years and with 22% of users aged 26-34 years.

Twitter is second largest social media site with 500 million users worldwide, tweeting170 million tweets a day. 30% of twitter users are 26-34 years with 25% aged 35-44 years

So, what is so special about Social Media? It has created opportunities for practitioners to reach out to potential clients in a more direct marketing route, create new professional networks and build relationships with existing clients (should they wish to be public).

Facebook, Twitter & Linkedin are the more popular choice, however, there are numerous other social media networks and blogging sites such as WordPress, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+.

In my opinion. all CAM practitioners should take advantage of the different types of Social Media marketing opportunities because first and foremost they are FREE.  Secondly, they can increase your brand awareness by directly reaching your target market and demographic. It is also a great way to increase traffic to your website and finally it gives a practitioner the chance to educate their audience (for those willing to listen) which may result in them using your services.

Everyone has their preferred type of Social Media platform, however, it is sensible to use several in connection with each other to produce a more powerful message. For example, if you can produce an educational video on an aspect of your work with You Tube, you can then tweet a link to the video on Twitter or post to Facebook. Your followers will then be able to “comment”, “like” or “re-tweet” to all of their followers which starts the viral nature that we so often see in the news with quirky stories or ultra-talented 6 year olds!

So the question is how does one get started? Well, firstly you need to decide what your goals are for using Social Media. Perhaps your targets are to increase your follower numbers, gain referrals through social media, direct more traffic through to your website, keep track of latest research and industry leaders in your field and what is being said.

Twitter allows you to post short updates or “tweets” of up to 140 characters and follow the updates of anyone that interests you.

You can target your tweets direct to your chosen market, for example. schools, gyms, corporate markets in your particular area of the country. This puts the word out about what you are doing in your practice which may lead to a build up a following in a certain territory/area.

You need to ensure that every tweet re-enforces your goal but you don’t want to look desperate so make sure you offer a variety of interesting facts, figures, pictures, links, videos, etc.

If you watch what other people in your industry “tweet” (the ones with lots of followers) try to model their technique as it takes some practice to fit all your information about your services into only 140 characters.

There are many tools within Twitter that can be used to target your audience

Hashtags ####

Putting a hashtag # before a word helps you to create a particular subject, news story, research or event that interests an audience. For example, during the opening ceremony of the London Olympics. The topic #openingceremony was used. By posting a tweet with #openingceremony in it, your tweet would be seen under that topic group. If it was relevant to your business, the topic and interesting, other Tweeters would look at your profile and see who you are and perhaps they may even click on the link to your website, thus driving more traffic to your website.

Be careful though, as you do not want to annoy other tweeters with a blatant marketing post that has nothing to do with the topic. Equally, you need to gauge carefully how witty and entertaining you are as this can affect your business image.

Increase your followers

This can be done in a couple of ways but personally I think it is more about quality of followers rather than quantity.

You need to think about your area and search for people using the “Discover” tab. Type #Brighton to find tweets on the topic of Brighton. They will usually be other businesses in that area. If you want to gain referrals from a gym in Brighton, look out for a gym under #Brighton tweets by reading their profile.  You can also go one further and see who follows the gym in Brighton as it may be some of their members in which case you can follow them too.

Who to follow or follow-back

Keep an eye on who follows you back. My rule of thumb is that if you follow someone and they do not follow you back then a week later you can unfollow them. Try and follow ten new people a week in order to keep on top of it.

If you want quantity then follow as many people as you like but make sure they are relevant to your target market. Some will follow back but not all.  You can tell the avid tweeters by the number of tweets they have in their tweet trail.

Ideally what you are aiming for is a solid base of followers who are interested in what you have to say and want to share it with their followers.

Don’t spam

Twitter is about relationship building and building some rapport with likeminded parties. If you have never interacted with them before it is best not to ask for re-tweets or referrals. Try to build up some dialogue with individuals first.

Beware of Direct Messages Hackers      

Direct messages or DM’s are a great way to personalise a message solely to a particular follower. Only they can see it. However, anyone sending a message to you suggesting that someone is saying something bad about you and inviting you to click on a link is more than likely to be an attempt to hack into your account.

If the message looks a little odd, do not click the link.

Most importantly – Think before you post

Think before you post and ask yourself these questions.

  • Does it re-enforce my business goals?
  • Is it interesting or relevant?
  • Am I violating client confidentiality?

Remember: anything that you post remains on the Internet forever and can be easily shared with others.

I hope this brief explanation of using Twitter as a marketing tool for your business is useful and for those of you who would like to see an example of how it is done. Go to www.twitter.com/LifePracticeUK

Client Coaching – Making the Difference

The CAM Coach Mark Shields examines the skills that we all need to get the best results for our clients. This month’s blog we look more in depth at the proven Life Practice coaching model CASPA

business coaching

Developing Practitioner Coaching Skills

At the moment through their own admittance many CAM practitioners readily admit they deal with a set of problems presented by their client by fact finding the client problems and making a set of recommendations to deal with the symptoms. By applying a set of simple coaching principles CAM Practitioners can not only deal with the output of the clients problems ( the symptoms ) but can also apply a simple coaching model called CASPA (not the white ghost) to highlight and manage the cause that puts us in a much stronger position to help our client and eliminate their problems forever. So what is CASPA?

What is CASPA ?

CASPA is a client needs driven coaching model very similar in principle to the Human Givens coaching model which you may already be aware of. The human givens model focuses entirely on the presumption as human beings we all have a series of needs that need to be met. When these needs aren’t being met certain contradictory and conflicting behaviours can emerge, to compensate for this lack of personal fulfilment. These behaviours often result in many of the symptoms we find in our clients. Weight Gain, Stress, Adrenal Fatigue and so on.

Dealing with Cause and Affect

By applying CASPA to the main areas of our client’s lifestyle we can find the route cause of the client’s problem driving the behaviour we are treating. That puts us in a very strong position as coaches as we can treat the symptoms but most importantly coach the cause of the problem as well. This is known to coaches as cause and effect. When working with a needs driven coaching model such as CASPA it is common practice to segment our client’s lives into four main areas.
These are
1. Health
2. Relationships
3. Career
4. Finance

CASPA represents the following needs that in theory we all need to be met as human beings to remain happy and fulfilled.

  • Control
  • Approval
  • Security
  • Purpose
  • Achievement

By applying CASPA to the four main areas of lifestyle you would complete a SOD (scale of discomfort) score 1-10 (1 meaning feeling fine and  10 feeling terrible). With a max score of 200 obviously the higher the score in a particular area highlights areas of cause to pinpoint

So let’s look at this in Principle

Case Study Example

Gemma gets in touch with you her as nutritional therapist as she has problems with gaining weight and is very tired especially first thing in the morning and struggles to get out of bed in the morning. She has put on a stone in the last three months and feels highly anxious during certain periods and comfort eats to combat her feelings of anxiety. She has recently experienced her first panic attack

Currently some nutritional therapists would complete a fact find (Client Questionnaire + data interpretation of symptoms), food diary and possibly some laboratory testing.

You would interpret the information you had received and make appropriate dietary recommendations and supplements, if necessary. A follow up appointment would be booked six weeks later depending on their case. At this meeting you would review their food diary and any change in symptoms and make adjustments to the recommendations as appropriate. Some of you may see the client two or three more times.

Applying CASPA

By applying CASPA we would establish Gemma was in stage 1 of stress (fear and panic) and her stress / adrenal fatigue was caused by work related stress at work when in the presence of her boss. We would then agree a set of focused goals to formulate a strategy to combat the problem caused at work. When coaching in this way client buy in, trust and focus is paramount so it wouldn’t be unusual to see your client weekly for the first month to ensure progress and develop momentum. In addition to her diet and eating habits we would examine how she handled the stress mentally and would with her to develop a strategy to combat the stress looking at all aspects of her lifestyle.

GROW Model

The GROW model is a review process you would use weekly to begin with to review your clients goals, motivate and inspire your client and ensure momentum is maintained.
G goals
R reality
O options
W way forward

Summary

CASPA is a basic coaching model allowing you to quickly identify the route cause of your client’s symptoms. CASPA is very useful when the client is unaware of the reason they are behaving in the way they are. CASPA enables you to formulate actions and goals at the beginning of your clients first session, get straight to the point and structure a plan and strategy immediately putting the client back in control from the moment you meet them.

Today’s Practitioner Habits Forge Tomorrows Practitioner Behaviour

Today more and more CAM practitioners are learning new skills and increasing their value to their clients and their ability to increase their income. In fact my opening line at the recent CAM Conference was if you remember “become your clients coach”.

Our new Life Practice Academy offer online business courses which give therapist’s the business skills and knowledge to improve success in their clinics.Sign up for free today at the Life Practice Academy

CASPA Model Copyright Life Practice

 

Are you ready to Change your career?

ARE YOU READY TO CHANGE YOUR CAREER?

ARE YOU READY TO TRY SOMETHING DIFFERENT?

ARE YOU PREPARED TO VENTURE OUT OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE?

Steve Nugent is an entrepreneur and currently owns three companies. that was until his life changed for the worse and he had draw on all his resources to find his way through a challenging time. Did NLP, famous for situations just like this manage to help him? Mark has been able to use such techniques and coaching skills to help me at a difficult time in my life. I find myself at a thought provoking cross roads where I am looking to identify the next steps of my own journey, which has led me, to date, on some lofty highs and lows where, at times, there was little light. Currently I am at the very beginning of the next Chapter, which brings great joy in levels of excitement, anticipation and freedom of choice, along with an equal measure of fear, of stepping again into the unknown, the fear of making the wrong choices with unidentifiable consequences which only such freedoms of choice provides…… Scary Huh!

So Why NLP? What Do I Expect?

Well on the surface I can give multiple reasons as to why I want to look at this area of study. But, what is slightly strange is that where the last chapter of my life came to an end I was left in a room with someone who is an expert in NLP. I have found that the word ‘expert’ gets banded about in the business world with the same frivolous abundance of many other business clichés and acronyms that we are subjected to….. It’s tiring at times ‘playing the game’ of identifying a genuine expert, this isn’t the case of finding just competence, that is easy, so I set about my normal routine of research and trial and error, fully prepared to pucker up and ‘kiss many frogs’ as I have been prepared to do many times in my life. But, to my great relief, after many exhausting, emotional and powerful sessions I found myself sitting in a room with one. How lucky is that? I could claim that it was down to my research but, as I have recently been discovering and embracing into my conscious that it was the law of attraction at work! Or, at the very least, the testament of how NLP has shaken off some of its mystery and now recognised in areas of counselling and coaching. I’ve digressed, back to the why and what do I expect? The why is also because I have always had a curiosity in areas of Psychology and the study of the mind, I see NLP as a practical extension of this specialist area of study. I am not an overly religious person and my upbringing hasn’t exactly been a smooth ride but, who’s has? I have an unconventional family (like many out there) who I love and love me unconditionally but, do take the warts and all approach. I have a wonderful partner who I have shared up’s and down’s with over the last 8 years and we have not only remained close but, our love grows stronger. The reason I mention my family is because this is where my early interest in Psychology was created, my desire to try and understand them and others and how it could make sense and my partner has been very supportive and understanding at very difficult times. But, why else NLP and what do I expect? Well on the face of things I could be considered relatively ‘successful’, I have owned my own businesses. I am competitive in nature and have always looked to push myself in all pursuits – however, I have never been totally happy with the results or fulfilled at my ‘achievements’! I feel I have come up short to where I wanted, I have never quite got the results I wanted, and I have been relentless bordering on obsessive with achievement. Others have basked in the sunshine of the success, whilst I have always settled for the shadow – it’s not that I don’t like the limelight, it’s just not what drives me. So what do I expect? Well as Einstein said when asked for his definition of insanity ‘Doing the same activity repeatedly but, expecting a different result’. So I suppose I expect to find different results, different goals and to be able to use the techniques and learning to fully execute along my new journey! Hey what’s the worst that can happen?

History and Overview of NLP

Starting with the history and from the research I have conducted I have found the following; Initial work was conducted in the 60’s/70’s at the University of California by Richard Bandler and John Grinder working alongside a team of anthropologists, social scientists and Linguists. The initial goal was to research methods of excellent psycho therapists and how they manage to achieve results, through this research a methodology emerged of its own. This was identifying others successful approach to a problem and modelling the behaviours and ways of thinking, then adapting these behaviours into a way that it can be modelled to achieve specific results. This was based around studying those highly considered leaders in their fields and identifying the approach, patterns and methods they were using to achieve results/solving problems. Such as the utilisation of speech patterns, tone, selection of words, body language – gestures, postures, eye movement and building a methodology of this model. Through the 60’s/70’s NLP started to find it’s foundations as a ‘new’ approach in neuroscience and became more established in the field of therapy and counselling. This was then adopted and adapted to other disciplines in business, sales, artists and sport.

Possible Applications of NLP?

So, what other applications and models can be extracted that could benefit utilising NLP techniques? Starting with an area that I have some experience, I can see lots of benefits that it can bring to Sales, Sales Leadership and Management, Human Resources and namely the identification of talent in the recruitment process and the ongoing personalised PDP (Personal Development Plan) for each employee. This would create great benefit for both employer and employee and will add a level of belonging, loyalty and repayment of the investment by the employee. Although, this has to be regularly updated and followed through by the employer so as not to be seen as superficial by the employee. It could also have some benefit and merit in the highly sales and bonus driven culture found in the Financial Services Industry. Where and individuals benefit is often found to be in direct conflict with the institution or on an even greater scale. Perhaps a way of modelling the moral and ethical behaviours as a approach to win back the confidence of the tax payer In conclusion, do I expect NLP to, on its own, deliver results of above my expectations? Well at this point it is difficult to answer in isolation as I have not yet set a defined goal for an expectation to be met. That said, I have never been one to settle for second best in terms of a result or in life. So a base level expectation of NLP will be for me to learn new skills and techniques that I can utilise in all areas of my life to provide better results. After all, what would the point be in taking these first steps of a new journey? Written by Steven Nugent Note from Mark: Steven is currently attending our Integrated NLP, Hypnotherapy & Coaching Training Diploma as I write and I am hoping to have him write his thoughts in my next blog once he has completed this course. To see further information on this course please visit http://www.lifepractice.co.uk/nlp-hypnotherapy-training Here is our video to give you a taster.

Consistently Sustaining A Profitable Practice

It is important to understand that when it comes to business planning we look at the Short Medium and Long term plan of any Business. This often goes overlooked and business owners focus on just one plan if any at all.

Ensure your business plan caters for the short, medium, and long term future of your business typically 1, 3 and 5 years. You will need to be flexible and able to adapt as the business world and market changes as we progress into the millennium years.

Short Term Plan =       6 – 12 Months

Medium Term Plan =   12 – 36 Months

Long Term Plan =        36 – 60 Months

You should commit to forecasting your business results in line with your short medium and long term plan. You should include anticipated appointment levels, income levels, activity, your different income streams and costs.

Short Term Plan =     6 – 12 Months

This plan would include the following

  • Start up Actions
  • Renting of Room
  • Ordering of Stationary
  • Creating first Website
  • First attempt at Advertising and Marketing

Medium Term Plan = 12 – 36 Months

This plan would include the following

  • Ongoing review of Action Plan
  • More Advanced Marketing Campaigns
  • Joint Ventures
  • Adding new Income Streams
  • Media Marketing
  • Personal Development
  • Adding new Therapeutic Disciplines
  • Formulation and Addition to ProductRange
  • Review / Change of Premises
  • Effective Change Management Program
  • Ongoing CPD
  • Data Marketing
  • Business Development

Long Term Plan =      36 – 60 Months

This plan would include the following

  • Effective Change Management Program
  • A review of Short and Medium term Business Plan
  • A more Strategic view of your overall Business Proposition
  • Merging or acquiring new businesses
  • Product Development
  • Keeping up with Economic and Legislative change
  • Attainment of further qualifications
  • Ongoing CPD
  • Strategic Business Development

And the list is endless and can go on and on.

Modeling Tip

Achieving success is one thing consistently sustaining a successful practice is something entirely different.

If we look at the success ratios of any practice over 30% fail in the first twelve months and only 8% remain profitable five years on.

This is why its imperative you ensure you have a five year business plan, split into the three segments of short, medium and long term.

Although it may appear that the three categories above are divided into three action plans, they are not.

They are 1 plan and 1 plan only

A good Practitioner should have 1 Business plan including short, medium and long term actions. This is how you keep up and manage change and stay ahead of the competition.

You simply include short medium and long term actions in the same plan and review the plan every month.

The key is to apportion your time in a sensible way as often short term action seem more pressing than an action you have five years to complete

The key is to dedicate your time to your business plan using the following time weightings

  • Short Term Plan         70%
  • Medium Term Plan    20%
  • Long Term Plan          10%

Think of these as three juggling balls you have to keep in the air all three all the time.

Conclusion

Writing a Business Plan is important, writing a meaningful Business Plan that captures the short medium and long term future of your business is paramount to the long term sustainable future of your practice

20121209-101707.jpgFurther details on how to set up and enjoy a successful Complementary & Alternative Clinic or Practice “The CAM Coach” book is now available to buy from http://www.thecamcoach.com

About The Author

Mark Shields, Life Coach, Author, Media expert and Motivational Speaker, is Managing Director of Life

Practice UK, specialists in Personal And Business Coaching. Contact: Tel: 01462 431112  info@lifepractice.co.uk

http://www.lifepractice.co.uk